It’s not new science it’s just not mentioned much yet. Vitamin D protects your brain function. This includes supporting new brain cell growth and removing amyloid.

Amyloid is a starch like protein that is deposited in the liver, kidneys, spleen or other tissues in certain diseases. It is known to lead to Alzheimer’s[1].

Alzheimer’s And Vitamin D

This is one of the biggest risk factors for so many because large numbers of people don’t get enough D through their diet and spend the needed time to activate D through sunlight exposure.

Wait. Are you saying I need to supplement Dr. Deb?  Yes and no. First, find out your numbers. I don’t care for the standard ‘blood test,’ but it’s fine if you can’t do the higher quality test we provide at our office.

Most labs suggest that if your result is over 52 for Vitamin, you’re fine. You’re not. Low levels of D are associated with memory loss and increased risk for dementia. Brain health studies suggest a level around 70-80 improve memory and decrease your risk for dementia[1].

Vitamin D protects your brain function by working to help you avoid age-related brain disease.

To improve your memory and decrease the risk of brain degeneration a supplement dose of 5,000 to 8,000 IU daily should be enough to keep brain tissues functioning at peak capacity.[1]

Why is Vitamin D Important for Brain Health?

Researchers have found that certain cells receptors in our brain are there to connect with D. The function of this connection in animals with Alzheimer’s is that it helps to clear the brain of Amyloid – the toxic protein that builds up and can lead to dementia and other age-related brain disorders. Vitamin D protects your brain function by working to remove Amyloid proteins.

I believe if my mother would have taken it she would not have developed Dementia.
 

In these animal studies, D helped support neurogenesis or the formation of new healthy brain cells!

In other words, D the vitamin can help you stave off age-related brain disorders before they happen.

We already know that Vitamin D or D3 helps to protect us against neuro-inflammation through decades of research.[1] Recent studies continue to validate this. Vitamin D protects your brain function by building new tissue, clearing harmful proteins and protecting you against chronic inflammation inside your head.

Outside of the Research On D3 and Brain Health

 

I’m a simple person. An earthy practitioner though I know many people want research to back up claims and I’ve provided that here. Now let’s talk about why you need to be sure you are taking Vitamin D3 and that you get tested at least yearly for your micronutrients.

  • Vitamin D deficiency is very common. It significantly affects brain health.
  • Mild cognitive impairment and dementia are common forms of age-related cognitive decline that D can help slow or prevent.
  • Both Alzheimer’s and Dementia along with aspects of healthy brain function are consistently associated with levels of vitamin D.
  • Higher levels of Vitamin D are shown to be protective of brain damage.
  • Lower levels also are associated with a significant increase in future cognitive dysfunction.
  • Supplements and regular testing helps you maintain the best levels for reducing inflammation and Amyloid proteins in your brain.

Of course, I see patients who take 8,000 IU of D, and they are still deficient. Their supplement is usually an over-the-counter, or a store purchased brand. Higher quality plays a role in healthy brain outcomes too. Vitamin D protects your brain function by working to help your brain stay young so you can enjoy more years of active living.

 

 

Resources:

[1] Motrello M, Landel V, Lacassagne E. et. al. Vitamin D Improves Neurogenesis and Cognition in a Mouse Model Of Alzheimer’s Disease. Mol Neurobiol. 2018 Aug; 55
[1] Neuroepidemiology journal, 2011, Alzheimer’s, vitamin d and dementia.
[1] Endocrine Practice 2012 Nov-Dec.; 18. Mitchell DM.
[1] J. Neuroimmune Pharmacologically 2017 Jun; 12. Cavello R.  and Epma. J 2017 Dec 8; Koduah P.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/article-abstract/1108038
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